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> Left Handers & Image Mirroring (a general question), Is it just me or others too...?
   Tigaer
post Aug 28 2011, 10:19 PM
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Often times i work on a picture and later in the making process i figure out that something is not right. And if i cant find a good solution my last try is to mirror the picture. And more than one time that really saved me. Especially composition wise. And now i wonder if some of you people sometimes do that too? Or is it my left hand brain just mixing things up wit how to read the picture properly. Now i know that you should always mirror your pic every now and then when making a picture, just to check the balance of everything. But like i said... often i finish the picture with not having its original orientation.

Would be cool to know you people's experience with that.




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   Kaioshen
post Aug 29 2011, 02:26 AM
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I never used to flip my images until I saw somebody do it one time and saw how important it was to the composition. I always flip my stuff now, mostly to get a fresh look at what I'm doing, but for the composition too to see how it's looking and what does or doesn't work. A lot of the times, like you said, I tend to finish a piece with the flipped image instead of the original orientation.
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   priteeboy
post Aug 29 2011, 01:36 PM
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I flip with almost everything. It is very important when drawing any kind of human character. Mine aren't very realistic but I try to minimize "wonkiness" in them when I finally summon up the will to draw one. I think it applies to anything that's meant to be symmetrical really, it's probably as valuable when drawing animals or cars/vehicles as it is with people. I first realized how important this was by accident really before I was full-on with digital. I think in the 8th grade I was at the peak of my drawing anime obsession (looking back now they stunk! but they were still the best in my school lol) I drew on paper and when I lifted it up to show someone, light filtered through and I saw it "flipped" from the back and only then I noticed how slanty and wrong it looked the other way around dry.gif

While most important on characters - anime or realistic, it does affect scenery a lot too, in fact in scenic works it feels like looking at a totally new piece, sometimes I actually prefer it flipped and decide to finish it off that way, other times I decide it needs something to weight out the composition on one end.

Basically, flipping the image is the closest thing to seeing your artwork as someone else would. When you work on it, you get used to it, halfway through it already doesn't feel like a new piece to you anymore, you get accustomed to all features - the good and the flaws and thus don't notice as much. Flipping can give you a whole new impression of it smile.gif




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   Tigaer
post Aug 29 2011, 02:18 PM
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Hehe nice story there. I find it funny how the brain seems to be happy with the original orientation when you work on the image. But sooner or later it starts to feel weird and flipping the image often helps solving that issue.

QUOTE (priteeboy @ Aug 29 2011, 03:36 PM) *
I flip with almost everything. It is very important when drawing any kind of human character. Mine aren't very realistic but I try to minimize "wonkiness" in them when I finally summon up the will to draw one. I think it applies to anything that's meant to be symmetrical really, it's probably as valuable when drawing animals or cars/vehicles as it is with people. I first realized how important this was by accident really before I was full-on ...





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   Tigaer
post Aug 29 2011, 02:21 PM
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Hehe, nice to see other artists doing it too. =) And yeah... flipping the image definitely helps to sort out a few things. But sometimes i think the flipped image works much better without really being able to identify why that is.

QUOTE (Kaioshen @ Aug 29 2011, 04:26 AM) *
I never used to flip my images until I saw somebody do it one time and saw how important it was to the composition. I always flip my stuff now, mostly to get a fresh look at what I'm doing, but for the composition too to see how it's looking and what does or doesn't work. A lot of the times, like you said, I tend to finish a piece with the flipped image instead of the original orientation.





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   Smiling Demon
post Sep 6 2011, 12:59 PM
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yeh I flip mine quite often, I also rotate my abstract work 90 degrees sometimes (doesn't work with landscape or more specific detailed artwork obviously), but this often helps me find a better composition smile.gif




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